Iridium

It’s the most extreme member of the platinum group. This whitish metal has a super high melting point, is one of the densest elements around and stands as the most corrosion-resistant metal. Iridium is processed from platinum ore and as a by-product of nickel mining.

Largest producers: South Africa.

Uses: Contribute to advancements in medicine, electronics and automobiles. It’s also used in products like pens, watches, compasses but not jaw crushers

Iridium
Ruthenium

Ruthenium

This member of the platinum metals retains many of the group’s characteristics, including hardness, rarity and an ability to withstand outside elements.

Largest producers: Russia, North and South America and Canada.

Uses: Can be added as an alloy to platinum and palladium in order to increase hardness and better resistance. Ruthenium has become quite popular in the electronics field, as a way to effectively plate electric contacts.

Rhodium

This extremely rare, valuable and silvery-colored metal is commonly used for its reflective properties. It has a high melting point and an amazing ability to withstand corrosion.  Do you need a geology course to find expensive metals?

Largest producers: South Africa, Russia, Canada and other countries.

Osmium

One of the densest elements on Earth, osmium is a bluish-silver metal. This very hard, brittle metal has an extremely high melting point.

Largest producers: Parts of Russia and North and South America.

Palladium

This grayish-white, precious metal is valued because of its rarity, malleability, stability under hot conditions and ability to absorb a considerable amount of hydrogen at room temperature.

Largest producers: Russia, South Africa, the United States, Canada and other various countries.

Uses: Automobile makers rely on it for their catalytic converters to reduce emissions, jewelers use palladium to create “white gold” alloys and electronics manufacturers have the option of plating with it.

palladium
rhenium

Rhenium

One of the densest metals, with the third highest melting point. Rhenium is a by-product of molybdenum, which essentially is a by-product of copper mining.

Largest producers: Chile, Kazakhstan and the United States.

Uses: Used in high-temperature turbine engines and added to nickel-based superalloys to improve temperature strength. Other uses include filaments, electrical contact material and thermocouples.

Indium

A rare metal produced from zinc-ore processing, as well as lead, iron and copper ores. In its purest form, it presents the color white and it’s extremely shiny and malleable.

Largest producers: China, South Korea and Japan.

Uses: During World War II, it was used as a coating for bearings in aircraft engines, but it can also be used to create corrosive-resistant mirrors, semiconductors, alloys and electrical conductivity in flat-panel devices.

promethium

Promethium

Promethium is a chemical element with the symbol Pm and atomic number 61. All of its isotopes are radioactive; it is extremely rare, with only about 500–600 grams naturally occurring in Earth’s crust at any given time. Promethium is one of only two radioactive elements that are followed in the periodic table by elements with stable forms, the other being technetium. Chemically, promethium is a lanthanide. Promethium shows only one stable oxidation state of +3.

Pyrite

The mineral pyrite  or iron pyrite, also known as fool’s gold, is an iron sulfide with the chemical formula FeS2 (iron(II) disulfide). Pyrite is considered the most common of the sulfide minerals.
Pyrite’s metallic luster and pale brass-yellow hue give it a superficial resemblance to gold, hence the well-known nickname of fool’s gold. The color has also led to the nicknames brass, brazzle, and Brazil, primarily used to refer to pyrite found in coal

pyrite

Californium 252

This is a Man Made element that sells for NEARLY $22,000,00 PER GRAM.  The reason for this ultra-expensive price is its rarity as only 8 grams have ever been made since 1950 and this extra-rare metal only last around 5 years. Californium is obviously too rare for average mortals like us.

californium-252

Global rare-earth production

Until 1948, most of the world’s rare earths were sourced from placer sand deposits in India and Brazil. Through the 1950s, South Africa was the world’s rare-earth source, from a monazite-rich reef at the Steenkampskraal mine in Western Capeprovince. Through the 1960s until the 1980s, the Mountain Pass rare earth mine in California made the United States the leading producer. Today, the Indian and South African deposits still produce some rare-earth concentrates, but they are dwarfed by the scale of Chinese production. In 2017, China produced 81% of the world’s rare-earth supply, mostly in Inner Mongolia,although it had only 36.7% of reserves. Australia was the second and only other major producer with 15% of world production. All of the world’s heavy rare earths (such as dysprosium) come from Chinese rare-earth sources such as the polymetallic Bayan Obo deposit.The Browns Range mine, located 160 km south east of Halls Creek in northern Western Australia, is currently under development and is positioned to become the first significant dysprosium producer outside of China.

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